728 x 90

Forget the Voters: City Council Considers Development Projects Without Voter Input

The Costa Mesa City Council is attempting to usurp a highly approved ballot measure giving voters input in city development projects. In footage from the July 19 council meeting, Mayor Pro Tem Andrea Marr alludes to the council directing staff to provide talking points to be in lockstep against the ballot measure. If true, this

The Costa Mesa City Council is attempting to usurp a highly approved ballot measure giving voters input in city development projects. In footage from the July 19 council meeting, Mayor Pro Tem Andrea Marr alludes to the council directing staff to provide talking points to be in lockstep against the ballot measure. If true, this would violate the Brown Act

During the council meeting, councilmembers requested a vote to approve a ballot measure which would allow the city to approve high density housing projects without voter approval. In a recent progress report conducted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), Costa Mesa’s regional housing needs could be as many as 11,760 units of housing by the year 2029. According to the HCD, 40% of those units–or 4,714 units out of the 11,760–would need to be affordable to lower-income households. 

Only one councilmember flagged concerns and refused to be in lockstep with the council against Measure Y.

Councilman Don Harper said the talking points given to council members was likely a violation of the Brown Act. 

“I’ve never [received talking points] before an item is voted on to promote an item, and almost every one of the talking points I’ve heard already here through a series of questions [by councilmembers.] 

“I’ve just never seen that done in council before…It seems inappropriate frankly for an issue we have not voted on to give all the councilmembers the same talking points,” he said.

Mayor Pro Tem Andrea Marr piped in, indicating she had the talking points made.

“You weren’t at the study session, so we thought it would be helpful for you.” 

Many residents have complained about high density housing projects, noting they would prefer to preserve single-family neighborhoods, restrict commercial and industrial growth from local neighborhoods, and maintain local control in any future planning decisions.

Do you think the council should take away planning power from Costa Mesa voters?

1 comment
Socal Daily Pulse
ADMINISTRATOR
PROFILE

Posts Carousel

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

1 Comment

  • Stephen
    November 7, 2022, 4:01 am

    I never understood the point of Measure Y. If you don’t trust your elected officials to do the jobs they were elected to, why did you bother voting for them?

    Measure Y is NIMBY incarnate. For example, do you think you’ll ever get voters to say, "Hey, I think we need cheaper housing in my city." vs "But my property values!!"

    Hell No. Because people often look out for themselves and only themselves.

    Not saying that’s bad for residents to think that way, but it’s government’s job to have a broader view and to make sure the city has a mix of housing so that local businesses can afford to hire employees that live here or cover the costs of their commutes. Otherwise those labor costs get passed along as a $25 cup of coffee if they can’t compete for employees.

    Measure Y destroyed that vital function of government, which made it impossible to get more housing built here, and making the problem of homelessness worse. And that’s just one of the kinds of development projects that would normally be handled by our government.

    REPLY

Latest Posts

Top Authors

Most Commented

Featured Videos